OPINION AND COMMENT

Editorials and other Opinion content provide perspectives on issues important to our community and are independent of the work of our newsroom journalists.

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Alex Savage, who has volunteered at the event since the age of 12, loads food into a refrigerated truck. For 25 years, the Myrtle Beach Red Cross has served Christmas dinner to those in need. Since Monday, crowds of volunteers have been working hard to prepare the thousands of mouths that will be fed.

Matt Silfer for The Sun News.

Clara’s 200th

“You never have to think about anything other than the need and how to meet it. “

These words from American Red Cross Founder Clara Barton, whose 200th birthday we celebrated in December, continue to guide today’s Red Cross volunteers, donors and partners as they exemplify her compassion and dedication to helping others.

This is where our Red Cross community – or people like you – come in to bring help and hope.

This year, the South Carolina Red Cross Eastern Chapter responded to nearly 300 disasters in the region, helping 1,000 people by distributing more than $ 212,000 in direct financial assistance in the aftermath of local disasters.

It’s always a time to take care of each other, and what better time to honor Clara’s saving legacy than when we celebrate her 200th birthday?

Visit redcross.org to learn more about how you can make a difference.

Michael Hesbach, Myrtle Beach

What really separates us?

In the past, you could tell who was anti-establishment. People railed against the government to protest the war in Vietnam.

As far as we know, campaign finance, political action committees, super PACs, and the countervailing power of lobbyists have not been factored into the equation. We didn’t know that corporations store their profits overseas.

Most people did not know that think tanks like The Heritage Foundation, Brookings Institute, and thousands of others are used to orchestrate social policy and political strategy.

Now it’s a very different game. Does being anti-establishment mean that we don’t think the government is doing well for its citizens?

That we need stricter regulations on corporate taxes, campaign finance, environmental protection, limitation and labeling of food ingredients, monitoring of working conditions and aspects that have an impact on our daily life?

Or does it mean that we are so against government having any control over the well-being of its citizens, personal freedom and the protection of individual rights until absolute corporate control ends at the expense of citizens? citizens and the nation?

Did we come to this questionable line in the sand by chance or could it have been purposefully constructed to divide us further?

Beverly Rubin-Watrous, Myrtle Beach

Too close for comfort

I have lived in my house for 20 years. This is the first time this year that several commercial airlines and a few small planes have flown over our homes on a daily basis.

What shocked me the most were the three commercial airlines that were flying so low over our homes that I couldn’t believe my eyes.

I have a close friend who now lives in Virginia who has come and left the Grand Strand several times to visit family and all of his flights were over the ocean.

I called and spoke with the airport manager twice about what I saw. I also sent him a letter and got no response, but what can he say?

I also sent an email recently to the FAA. No response yet.

Sarah Stephens, Murrells Inlet

Keep it clean

I have noticed that more and more cartoons on the Opinion page in The State contain profanity, for example the December 19 edition.

I think this is very inappropriate. It doesn’t have to be, and it could very well lead others, especially young people, to think that using profanity is “cool” if the newspapers promote it.

Let’s do our part to clean up society, not make it dirty.

Samuel J Grant Jr., Darlington

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